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Graduate Courses Spring 2013


CLASS-GA 1005 Survey of Latin Literature

Professor Joy Connolly
M&W 9:30-10:45
Silver Center, Room 503A

CLASS-GA 1012 Latin Rhetoric and Stylistics
Professor Gregson Davis
Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 4 credits.
Silver Center, Room 503A
The aim of this class is to foster advanced knowledge of Latin grammar through the analysis of the work of representative authors from the Golden Age.  Since students will be expected to have prior knowledge of the fundamentals of morphology, class sessions will focus on nuances of syntax, style and rhetoric. We will intersperse regular readings from the works of Caesar (Gallic Wars) and Cicero (mainly excerpts from the latter’s philosophical corpus, such as De Finibus), with practical exercises in prose composition modeled on these acclaimed stylistic masters. The vast majority of assigned written exercises will consist in translating English sentences into Latin; however, the course will culminate in assignments of continuous prose composition.

CLASS-GA 2941 Greek Orators
Professor Andrew Foster
Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 4 credits.
Fordham, Room TBA

CLASS-GA 3002 The Persian Empire
Professor Andrew Monson
Tuesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 4 credits.
Silver Center, Room 503A
Once based almost entirely on Greek historical narratives, the study of the Achaemenid Persian empire (ca. 550-330 BCE) has been enriched and revised in recent decades by Near Eastern perspectives. This course aims primarily to introduce graduate students to the current problems and debates through a survey of the diverse and multilingual sources. We will assess the reliability of the Greek accounts and the significance of Greek-Persian relations from the sixth to the fourth century BCE. Finally, we will try to understand the meaning and dynamics of empire and imperialism within a comparative framework.

CLASS-GA 2814 Caesar
Professor Robert Penella
Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 4 credits.
Fordham, Room TBA
A reading of the Bellum Gallicum and the Bellum Civile.  We shall consider the commentary as a genre, the role of the two commentaries in Caesar's political career, the commentaries as narrative and as apology, and more recent approaches that analyze them as artful prose.  There will be readings in secondary literature and a course paper as well as short oral presentations and a midterm and final examination.  A week each will also be devoted to Caesar's Anticato and to his De Analogia.

CLASS-GA 2873 Horace's Odes
Professor Philip Thibodeau
Monday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 4 credits.
CUNY Graduate Center, Room TBA

CLASS-GA 3001 Modern Approaches to Ancient Historiography
Professor Liv Yarrow
Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 4 credits.
CUNY Graduate Center, Room TBA

CLASS-GA 1002 Art & Archaeology of the Greco-Roman Near East and Egypt
Professor Elizabeth Macaulay-Lewis
Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 4 credits.
CUNY Graduate Center, Room TBA

CLASS-GA 3000 The Athenian Acropolis: Myth, Cult, Image and Architecture
Professor Joan Connelly
Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 4 credits.
Silver Center, Room 503A
This seminar examines the Athenian Acropolis and its development from a Mycenaean citadel to a Greek sanctuary, to an iconic place of meaning and memory.  Special topics for consideration include: landscape, memory, and the making of myth; gods, monsters, and the cosmos; genealogical narratives and architectural sculpture; foundation myths and Acropolis ritual; war, death, remembrance and the shaping of sacred space; the Panathenaic festival, citizenship, and democracy; ritual movement, performance, and sacred space; and, the legacy of the Athenian Acropolis at Hellenistic Pergamon.

CLASS-GA 2970  Aristophanes
Professor David Sider
Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 4 credits.
CUNY Graduate Center, Room TBA

CLASS-GA 3003 Callimachus
Professor Dee Clayman
Monday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 4 credits.
CUNY Graduate Center, Room TBA

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